Derek Jarman: Protest!

The first painting on view when entering Manchester Art Gallery’s Protest! exhibition is entitled Queer. It is a large canvas painted a romantic red with the word queer scrawled messily in white paint across a simple heart symbol. It’s a pretty representative example of the work on display here as it combines a simple abstract ground with a bold and ironic slogan. The juxtaposition of an aesthetic backdrop with a polemical foreground hints towards Jarman’s sublime filmmaking with its oneiric deconstruction of ideological dogma.

Queer, 1992
Continue reading “Derek Jarman: Protest!”

Reviews (updated)

Waiting for You: A Detectorists Zine issue one was reviewed by SkaldSummerisle over at the Folk Horror Revival site.

“A fanzine as beautiful and introspective as the series it lauds.” https://folkhorrorrevival.com/2021/04/08/waiting-for-you-a-detectorists-zine/

And by Radical Bookshelf over on Instagram.

“Much like the show it exalts, Waiting For You is a charming and engaging read, made with affection and care. Phenomenal work.” https://www.instagram.com/p/CVaiwQqKyAl/

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Meanwhile, Interzone has been reviewed by Forrest Aguirre on his blog.

“I think that Interzone is a great reminder that those liminal spaces can be appreciated for what they are, where they are, and what they symbolize.” http://forrestaguirre.blogspot.com/2021/06/interzone.html

And by Radical Bookshelf on Insta.

“The appeal of edge lands is that in an age where cities are increasingly turning into a society of control, liminal spaces remain something of a lawless zone. . . The author suggests that with some imagination these locations could instead be used as ideal staging grounds for countercultural and subversive behaviours through art, ritual and conscious intent.” https://www.instagram.com/p/CUHyVnAjrkF/

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And Man is the Animal: A Coil Zine issue 1 has been reviewed by John Coulthart.

“A timely publication, given the persistent and increasing interest in Coil, and one whose essays are all of a quality belied by the “zine” label which usually suggests something more fannish and trivial. This is a pleasing object even before you look inside, a perfect-bound A5 booklet with full-colour printing throughout, and a cover painting by Val Denham.” http://www.johncoulthart.com/feuilleton/2021/07/28/man-is-the-animal-a-coil-zine/

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All of Temporal Boundary Press’ publications can be seen here: https://temporalboundary.bigcartel.com/products

Man is the Animal: A Coil Zine issue 2

Temporal Boundary Press

Issue 2 of Man is the Animal: A Coil Zine is now available for pre-order.

https://temporalboundary.bigcartel.com/product/man-is-the-animal-a-coil-zine-issue-2

Contents

A Slip (or a Jump) In Beverley Road by Nick Soulsby

Letter to the Esoteric Order of Dagon by John Balance

Towards a Magickal Appreciation of Coil by Patrick Weir

Agapanthus: Four Poems for John Balance by Jeremy Reed

The Chaosphere by Stephen Sennitt

Shakespeare, Jarman, Coil: A Conversation by Cormac Pentecost

Everything Keeps Dissolving by Sheer Zed

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The Eeriness of Spacetime in Christopher Nolan’s Interstellar

The relativity and subjective experience of time are issues of persistent interest to the film maker Christopher Nolan. His first feature film, Memento, is specifically concerned with time, following its lead character, Leonard, who suffers from anterograde amnesia. The film is edited to play out in a sequentially reverse order so that the viewer experiences the same sense of disorientation as Leonard. In Inception, Leonardo Di Caprio plays Cobb, a specialist in inserting himself into other people’s dreams and extracting valuable information from them. The film builds to an extraordinary climax wherein three separate but embedded levels of dream run in three separate timelines. Each dream within a dream represents a deeper level of the subconscious mind; the deeper into the subconscious the characters descend the more that time becomes drawn out so that an hour experienced in the deepest level corresponds with only a few seconds at the shallowest level. Nolan also uses three intersecting timelines with different durations in Dunkirk. The soldiers on the beach are followed over a one-week period; the boats crossing the Channel are followed for one day; and the Spitfires take one hour to cross the Channel. The timelines flip between each other without signalling that they are running within differing parameters. The effect is to create a psychologically coherent set of narratives that nonetheless represent varied timescales.

Continue reading “The Eeriness of Spacetime in Christopher Nolan’s Interstellar”

Spacetime in Alan Garner’s Red Shift

Sirius is 8.6 light years away
Arcturus is 37
The past is the past and it’s here to stay
Wikipedia is heaven

Nick Cave
We Real Cool

In the opening sequence of Alan Garner’s powerful 1973 novel, Red Shift, two young lovers, Tom and Jan, are hanging around an area of Cheshire overlooking the M6 motorway chatting about Jan’s imminent departure to study in London. The dialogue is remarkable, as indeed it is throughout the book, mixing observations of trivial detail with profound emotion. In particular, it quickly becomes apparent that Tom has a high verbal acuity possibly shading into the speech of a savant. He alternates between moments of drably stated self-pity, genuine tenderness and voluminous, pedantic iterations of his encyclopaedic knowledge. He is a sad and maladroit character unable to reconcile the reality of his emotional life with his knowledge of the vastness of the cosmos. Cosmology seems to tell him that there is nothing to hold on to, nowhere solid to grasp and hold, nothing to provide a fulcrum of certainty. But what is also apparent is that his relationship with Jan provides him some sort of definite point of reality. Jan’s presence in his life is the lode star around which his cosmos moves.

Continue reading “Spacetime in Alan Garner’s Red Shift”

Waiting for You: A Detectorists Zine issue 2

I’m delighted to announce that the second issue of Waiting for You: A Detectorists Zine is now available to pre-order. https://temporalboundary.bigcartel.com/product/waiting-for-you-a-detectorists-zine-issue-2-pre-order

Contents

Comfort Viewing: Detectorists in an Age of Anxiety 
by Innes M. Keighren

Detectorists: The Joy Of Obsessive Hobbies 
by Scott Lyall

Permissions: Who Owns the Land? 
by Cormac Pentecost

Ponderings Upon Connection Through Introspection 
by Bec Lambert

The Holy Grail of Metal Detecting: Finding the Staffordshire Hoard 
by Kevin Leahy

And the Scarecrow Sees and the Scarecrow Knows: Thoughts on Worzel Gummidge 
by Andy Paciorek

Various Artists – Brutal Africa: The Heavy Metal Cowboys of Botswana 
& Crackdust – Dented Reality 
by Cormac Pentecost

Reviews

Waiting for You: A Detectorists Zine issue one was reviewed by SkaldSummerisle over at the Folk Horror Revival site.

“A fanzine as beautiful and introspective as the series it lauds.” https://folkhorrorrevival.com/2021/04/08/waiting-for-you-a-detectorists-zine/

Meanwhile, Interzone has been reviewed by Forrest Aguirre on his blog.

“I think that Interzone is a great reminder that those liminal spaces can be appreciated for what they are, where they are, and what they symbolize.” http://forrestaguirre.blogspot.com/2021/06/interzone.html

Man is the Animal: A Coil Zine

The relentless march of Temporal Boundary Press to world domination continues apace with issue one of a new title. Man is the Animal: A Coil Zine is dedicated to the esoteric music project pursued by Jhonn Balance and Peter Christopherson. It is available now for pre-order: https://temporalboundary.bigcartel.com/product/man-is-the-animal-a-coil-zine-issue-1

Contents

The Vision and the Voice: Esoteric Dimensions of Coil’s Vocals 
by Hayes Hampton

A Hauntology of Coil 
by Sean Oscar

Are You Loathsome Tonight?: Coil’s Transformations 
by Benjamin Noys

The Horseman Betrays His Steed 
by Cormac Pentecost

The Spaces Between: Outside the Circles of Time and Love’s Secret Domain 
by Andy Sharp

Jhonn is Unbalanced 
by Val Denham

Dancer in the Dark

I first saw the film Dancer in the Dark at the cinema on its release in 2000. Having just rewatched it twenty years later it reminded me very strongly of how powerful a director Lars von Trier is and also of how effecting Björk’s performance in the lead role is. I guess that revisiting a film after such a long break should also present an opportunity for some ‘mature’ reflection on what has changed in the interim.

The film is set in 1960s America and follows the story of Selma (Björk) who is a Czech immigrant. Selma is suffering from an ocular condition which is causing her to go blind. She keeps this condition as hidden as possible because she fears losing her factory job. Her job is intensely important to her because she is saving money to pay for her young son to have an eye operation that will prevent him from inheriting his mother’s blindness. Selma finds some escape in watching musicals at the cinema, and as her sight deteriorates she slips in and out of fantasy segments where her immediate environment and the people around her appear to be part of a musical performance.

Continue reading “Dancer in the Dark”